M is MEXICO #TravelWithBooks #AtoZchallenge @AprilA2Z

M is Mexico

Mexico has always been in the news and the books are equally eye catching. The books represent its rich heritage, culture and environment. I have added a few more to my TBR, I am sure you will too after reading about the books from Mexico.

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Lost Children Archive by Valeria Luiselli

LONGLISTED FOR THE WOMEN’S PRIZE FOR FICTION 2019. The moving, powerful and urgent English-language debut from one of the brightest young stars in world literature.

Suppose you and Pa were gone, and we were lost. What would happen then?

A family in New York packs the car and sets out on a road trip. A mother, a father, a boy and a girl, they head south west, to the Apacheria, the regions of the US which used to be Mexico. They drive for hours through desert and mountains. They stop at diners when they’re hungry and sleep in motels when it gets dark. The little girl tells surreal knock knock jokes and makes them all laugh. The little boy educates them all and corrects them when they’re wrong. The mother and the father are barely speaking to each other.

Meanwhile, thousands of children are journeying north, travelling to the US border from Central America and Mexico. A grandmother or aunt has packed a backpack for them, putting in a bible, one toy, some clean underwear. They have been met by a coyote: a man who speaks to them roughly and frightens them. They cross a river on rubber tubing and walk for days, saving whatever food and water they can. Then they climb to the top of a train and travel precariously in the open container on top. Not all of them will make it to the border.

In a breath-taking feat of literary virtuosity, Lost Children Archive intertwines these two journeys to create a masterful novel full of echoes and reflections – a moving, powerful, urgent story about what it is to be human in an inhuman world.

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Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel

Earthy, magical, and utterly charming, this tale of family life in turn-of-the-century Mexico blends poignant romance and bittersweet wit. This classic love story takes place on the De la Garza ranch, as the tyrannical owner, Mama Elena, chops onions at the kitchen table in her final days of pregnancy. While still in her mother’s womb, her daughter to be weeps so violently she causes an early labor, and little Tita slips out amid the spices and fixings for noodle soup. This early encounter with food soon becomes a way of life, and Tita grows up to be a master chef, using cooking to express herself and sharing recipes with readers along the way.

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The Labyrinth of Solitude by Octavio Paz

Octavio Paz has long been acknowledged as Mexico’s foremost writer and critic. In this international classic, Paz has written one of the most enduring and powerful works ever created on Mexico and its people, character, and culture. Compared to Ortega y Gasset’s The Revolt of the Masses for its trenchant analysis, this collection contains his most famous work, “The Labyrinth of Solitude,” a beautifully written and deeply felt discourse on Mexico’s quest for identity that gives us an unequalled look at the country hidden behind “the mask.” Also included are “The Other Mexico,” “Return to the Labyrinth of Solitude,” “Mexico and the United States,” and “The Philanthropic Ogre,” all of which develop the themes of the title essay and extend his penetrating commentary to the United States and Latin America.

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Down and Delirious in Mexico City: The Aztec Metropolis in the Twenty-First Century by Daniel Hernandez 

In 2002, Daniel Hernandez traveled to Mexico City, searching for his cultural roots. He encountered a city both chaotic and intoxicating, both underdeveloped and hypermodern. In 2007, after quitting a job, he moved back. With vivid, intimate storytelling, Hernandez visits slums populated by ex-punks; glittering, drug-fueled fashion parties; and pseudo-native rituals catering to new-age Mexicans. He takes readers into the world of youth subcultures, in a city where punk and emo stand for a whole way of life—and sometimes lead to rumbles on the streets. 

Surrounded by volcanoes, earthquake-prone, and shrouded in smog, the city that Hernandez lovingly chronicles is a place of astounding manifestations of danger, desire, humor, and beauty, a surreal landscape of “cosmic violence.” For those who care about one of the most electrifying cities on the planet, “Down & Delirious in Mexico City is essential reading” (David Lida, author of First Stop in the New World).

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A to Z of  Incredible Indian Authors was my previous theme and you can read the posts here.

Previous Posts in the 2019 A to Z Challenge

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Comments

  1. Shilpa Garg

    Lost Children Archive and Like Water for Chocolate… they appeal to me and I would like to add them in my TBR too. Thanks for recommending, Inderpreet. And I like your theme for this years AtoZ Challenge 🙂

  2. Kaddu

    You are listing books by the places they are based in? Wow! Interesting theme, Indy!
    I’m not doing any reading at all for months!
    It becomes impossible for me to put a book down once I pick it up. So I’m avoiding it nowadays, because I have tons of work to do! 😛
    Did you read my 10 Bookish Challenges post that I posted for B?
    Anyway, do try to keep up with the schedule as far as possible. Waise, I am also lagging behind. Just published my N! [rolls eyes]
    Kaddu recently posted…10 Personal Skills Of Narendra Modi That Truly Inspire Me #TenOnTuesday #AtoZChallengeMy Profile

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